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Is it possible to regenerate the energy and appeal of hot hatches like the Golf Gti? A new sporting generation is on the streets, and we're looking for a winner with the potential to be at the core of popular appeal for years to come.

Motorfair
STAR TEST
Escort RS2000
versus
Vauxhall Astra Gsi
versus
Fiat Tipo 16V
versus
Honda Civic VTi
The champ is back. That, at any rate, is Fordís message to those fast hatch drivers who can remember when affordable performance was rear-drive, leaf-sprung Mid Escort RS2000 shaped and the VW Golf GTI, the car that yanked enthusiast motoring into the modem world, was still a twinkle in its designerís eye.

The 1991 RS2000, however, is part of that world and will need more than nostalgia to re-establish its famous name among the new generation of 150bhp hot hatches beginning to filter into the showrooms.

Early impressions suggest that itís got what it takes. As the first real driverís car in the new Escort range, it shows more promise than any new Ford since the Sierra Cosworth, if a long time coming.

Itís been a longer wait still for the hot version of the Fiat Tipo, but, after innumerable cancellations, the promised Sedicivalvole will be on sale from 2 January, three years after the first Tipo arrived in Britain.

Vauxhall fully understands how the presence of a potent sporting model to spearhead its range can generate sales for the volume-sellers further down the scale, so, conversely, it has contrived to launch the two-litre 16-valve Astra at the same time as most other models in the new Astra line-up. This time around, though, the sporting Astra loses the GTE name in favour of GSi.

Both the Astra GSi and the Ford RS2000 are fully paid-up members of the 150bhp club and, as everyone must be aware, the big sales battle is between these two. The Fiat Tipo 16v, also a twin-cam normally aspirated two-litre four, just scrapes into this elite line-up with 148bhp.

But thereís one other high-spirited newcomer, on sale from 22 November, which must also be considered alongside this company: the new Honda Civic VTi. A full 2ins longer than the RS2000, this bigger and beefier Civic punches out a frenetic 158bhp from its free-spinning VTEC engine of just 1.6-litres, and a price of around £14,500 gives it a significant edge when compared with the £15,600 asked for the Vauxhall Astra GSi or £15,995 for the Ford. Fiatís Tipo, the only one of the bunch with five-doors, appears to offer the best value at £13,949, but anti-lock brakes, standard fit on the others, is only available at an extra £948. Catalytic converters are standard on all four.

Place these four 130mph hot hatches together and itís obvious that two are overtly sporting, the remaining pair somewhat more restrained. Either tactic could win or lose sales, especially in view of the unwanted attention lately bestowed on this type of car from the criminal elements as well as insurance companies keen to make extra bucks out of the present situation.

The aggressively styled Astra GSi grabs the attention with both hands, but itís reassuring to know that it carries some defences against theft in the form of its door dead-locks and standard anti-theft alarm. Just as sporty, but better proportioned and prettier, the Honda Civic offers no such crime deterrents.

If the RS2000 has a problem, itís merely that the changes to separate it from the remainder of the Escort pack are so subtle as to go almost unnoticed. Restraint is favoured by the otherwise arresting Tipo 16v, too. Without careful examination itís really only the 15ins alloy wheels that set these high-power versions apart from the lesser models in the range.

PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMY

Ever since the original Astra GTE 16v stormed the hot hatch scene with its immensely torquey engine, this has been the normally aspirated engine to beat in its class. Only a few have come close. With forged pistons, a classic twin-cam head design with four valves per cylinder and a technically advanced electronically injected sequential fuelling system linked with digital ignition, it represents the state of the art in production engine design. It looks the part too, with nicely finished silver and red cam covers.

Three years on, the same engine powers the GSi, although fitting a catalytic converter has seen the power drop from 156 to 150bhp at 6000rpm and the torque drop by a similar margin to 145lb ft.

These are impressive figures nonetheless, so perhaps itís no surprise that a remarkably similar design of cylinder head has been chosen by Ford to sit atop the I4-series engine (as seen in the Sierra and Granada in eight-valve form) to power the RS2000. Its cam covers even share the same silver and red colour scheme.

Fordís EEC-1V management system takes care of the sparks and fuel metering for the multi-point injection to create an engine to equal the Vauxhallís power, but the torque canít quite match the Vauxhallís at 140lb ft.

Engine
Tipo 16v: 148 bhp, quiet, but quick.
Fiat too has opted for a four-valve per cylinder twin-cam layout for the hot Tipo, naturally with electronically managed ignition and fuel. Unlike the other two-litre engines here, the Fiat unit has twin balancer shafts, and if the businesslike rough-finished alloy castings look vaguely familiar, thatís because it is developed from the Lancia Themaís engine. The output figures of 148bhp and 131lb ft are strong but eclipsed by those of the Ford and Vauxhall.

For all their high specific power, these three engines were developed as much for strong mid-range lugging ability as for top-end zap. Each can claim that around 90 per cent of peak torque is available from as low as 2500rpm. There are no such compromises for the Civic VTiís beautifully-engineered and technically advanced four. This engine is what race mechanics refer to as a Ďscreamerí. It thrives on revs, and thatís confirmed by the power peak of 7500rpm and the torque peak just 500rpm less.

Combining the same basic multi-valve format as the other engines here, but with the notable addition of electro-hydraulic three-stage variable valve timing, Honda extracts 158bhp and 111lb ft from a mere 1595cc. That places it right at the pinnacle of four-cylinder production engine development, and the resulting specific power output of 99bhp per litre is the highest of any volume-produced naturally aspirated car engine.

For all the high-revving histrionics of the Honda, Vauxhallís two-litre four still takes some beating. On the road, itís always the Astra that proves hardest to catch in any power struggle, and such is the depth and accessibility of the power that being in precisely the right gear all of the time is not essential. This lugging ability, complemented by a continuing vitality at the top end of the rev band, would make for an engine still very much in the running as the best of its type were it not for the over-loud gruffness that so dominates hard use.

Fordís offering could almost be a carbon copy of the Astraís engine, but with a less offensive note low down, less top-end verve and an annoyingly loud drone should the full extent of the rev band be exploited. That said, kept below 6000rpm it is an excellent engine, every bit as good as the Vauxhallís for lowdown torque but less vocal. It just gets on with the job.

In such company, the Tipo might well be expected to reveal some shortcomings. Not so, at least not anywhere but at the test track. Its strength lies in a responsive and gutsy mid-range, easily exploited and a delight to listen to. Itís the quietest powerplant of the quartet and, on the road, the Tipo feels almost as quick as the Ford and Astra, except at the top end, where the Fiat engine begins to run out of steam just a little too early.

Thatís at about 5000rpm, which is where the Honda VTEG engine is just beginning to build up a head of steam. This engine is nothing short of amazing. Despite the figures, initial acquaintance leads you to believe that itís really quite gutless compared with its two-litre rivals. But when 5000rpm shows on the dial, the little VTEC somehow finds its vigour multiplied. From here through to well beyond 8000rpm, where an upchange magically brings you back to the start of it all again, thereís as much power as you could wish for in a hot hatch, and itís accompanied by the most delightfully encouraging howl this side of an NSX. Without doubt, itís the smoothest and sweetest engine here, but it does require constant stirring of the ultra-slick gearshift if it is to be fully exploited.

In real road situations thereís only marginal differences in straight-line speed between the four. The biggest difference is that the Honda demands more from the driver because the correct gear is essential if instant power is wanted. For refinement and the appeal of the sounds of their engines -- noise quality -- the Fiat and the Honda emerge in front.

Check out the test track times and two distinct patterns emerge. From a standing start the Astra and Civic are quickest. To 60mph the Astra records 7.2secs, the Civic just a tenth behind, while the Ford and Fiat trail by a full second. By 100mph the Civic is still up with the Astra, just two tenths behind, but the others have fallen back by a further second. The Civic turns the tables on the Astra to record the best 30-70mph time of 7.0secs, the Astra at 7.2secs and the Tipo and RS2000 a little way behind in the high sevens. All are respectably quick, and each can attain 130mph on the flat.

A thorough analysis of the in-gear times makes it no easier to draw any meaningful conclusions other than to note that the Ford and Vauxhall come out slightly ahead more often than the Fiat and Honda. The RS2000 is aided by lower gear ratios than the Astraís, and this gives it a slight bonus in some increments, but thereís no substantial difference other than at the top end, where the Vauxhall benefits from more bite. The Tipo loses out slightly, but the differences are measured in fractions rather than full seconds, and the Honda pulls out a surprise in proving far stronger than it feels at the low end of the engineís power band. In top, for example, itís beaten only by the RS2000 in the 50-70mph increment.

Differences in fuel economy are small too. All are equipped with a catalytic converter, so unleaded is the required diet, and all cracked 25mpg on our hard-driven group test route. Fiatís Tipo came out worst with 25mpg dead, the smaller capacity but higher powered Civic was best with 26.9, and the RS 2000 and the Astra GSi slugged it out with 25.9 and 26.4mpg respectively. Differences in tank sizes mean that the Honda and Fiat will be first for a refill.

In the final analysis, all of these possess charismatic engines well suited to the task of sports driving. The Astra remains the best in its power characteristics, the RS2000 only marginally behind, but both of these lose out on refinement and noise quality to the thoroughly enjoyable Tipo 16v unit. For day-to-day driving, its engine is arguably the best of the lot. The effervescent little Honda engine can produce as much pleasure as any here if you are in the mood for it, but the Honda is not a car for lazy drivers.

HANDLING AND RIDE

Front View
Fiat offers fluent and secure-feeling handling, with consistent driver feedback.
Extracting around 150bhp from a two-litre engine isnít that difficult in the Ď90s, but getting that power to the ground through wheels that must share the task with steering the car and transmitting a continuous stream of information to the driver is a different matter entirely.

In response to an inability to tame satisfactorily the effects of 145lb ft of torque, Vauxhall has resorted to electronic traction control (ETC) to bring matters in hand.

Itís only a partially successful solution. No one is casting doubt on Vauxhallís ETC in its ability to deal with the onset of torque-induced wheelspin, but it lacks subtlety, often cutting the power for far longer than is necessary before allowing the driver to regain the use of his right foot.

And, of course, it doesnít actually tackle the root of the problem. There remains an awkwardness about the steering as it tugs at your grip under power and demands constant corrections over bumpy surfaces and when crossing road markings. This feeling of always having to work at the steering is perhaps amplified by the fairly large-diameter rim and too-low gearing for the otherwise well weighted steering, and the corruption of feedback that the system causes places a heavy burden on the Astraís ability to produce genuine driving pleasure.

The Ford RS2000 manages to avoid these pitfalls with its lighter and more direct steering, backed up by a flat cornering stance and sharp turn-in. Itís a world apart from lesser models in the Escort range, but ultimate fluency through a series of bends is masked by a distinct lack of feedback, and there remains a tendency to spin an inside front wheel on the tighter corners, which further deadens the steering.

Itís left to Fiat and Honda, admittedly both with less torque on offer, to demonstrate how to cope effectively with transmitting power to the ground without dramatics. While the Civic displays fine manners with direct and accurate steering responses, itís the Tipo which impresses most, and itís the only one here with any true fluidity. That said, it offers little in the way of throttle adjustability, and charging too hard into a corner occasionally meets with the sudden onset of understeer. But most of the time it grips well and handles securely and confidently, with the most fluent driver feedback of the four and the most fluid line through a complex of bends.

The Astra, partially tamed by ETC, has only limited appeal with its nose-led character, although itís certainly quick -- fat tyres and decent grip see to that -- and roll is kept to negligible proportions. A better balance is achieved by both the RS2000 and the Civic.

These exploit the rear tyres as well as the fronts to produce nimble characteristics, but although the Honda possesses a degree of predictable throttle adjustability that can be exploited by the skilled driver, with the Ford thereís less certainty about which end has the least grip at any one time, leading to ragged on-limit behaviour and a sapping of driver confidence. But youíd only find this out on the test track; at road speeds the RS is capable, grippy and satisfying to drive.

In the wet, the Civicís Dunlops struggle unsuccessfully to maintain the same grip as the others, and when pushed hard over undulating moorland roads its suspension -- supple and effective elsewhere -- fails to maintain an iron grip on wheel and body control. The Astra, its hard, uncompromising suspension asked to work overtime in these tough conditions, skips and skates over the bumps, and it too loses marks here. Fordís RS2000 copes much better, and is more than up to the task, but the best controlled suspension belongs to the Tipo 16v. It possesses the best ride quality of the lot, though none of these cars achieves a truly inspiring blend of ride and handling.

Rear View
Best ride quality of the four for Tipo.
On the motorway, the Fiat again produces the most supple and best controlled ride, but the Honda too remains acceptably absorbent on good surfaces and is capable of masking the worst effects of potholes and ridges, something the RS2000ís suspension has trouble coping with. But not to the extent of the Astra GSi: its ride improved, over the GTEís, is simply not up to the required standard, especially around town, where it jiggles over the tiniest pit in the road surface.

All the test cars came equipped with anti-lock brakes, standard-fit on all bar the Tipo. While the Fiatís and Hondaís brakes always felt positive and firm, the Astra suffers from a slightly mushy pedal and our test RS2000ís brakes remained soggy and lifeless throughout. A faulty anti-lock braking system, which periodically refused to work, probably contributed to this.

With its new gearbox and pleasingly close ratios, cog-swapping is no hardship with the Fordís light and pleasant shift action. Itís almost up to the Hondaís finely engineered standard, but thereís credit here for the Astra too. Its gearchange is much improved in the GSi. The Tipo, too, has the best gearchange of any Fiat weíve tried recently. Although the slightly rubbery action and heavy clutch arenít quite in the same league as the others, it changes cleanly and positively, and itís as quick as the driver. Close ratios characterise all four Ďboxes.

AT THE WHEEL
Engine
The Fiat's front seats are excellent, even better than the Recaros in the RS2000.

The notion that driver comfort takes second place in a sporting car is refuted once and for all by the new breed of hot hatches. For the most part, Vauxhall has more or less got it right with the Astra GSi. A decent driving position, supportive and well-trimmed seats, plenty of footspace, a good-to-hold leatherrim wheel and large, easy to read instruments all contribute to a cabin thatís easy to live with, if a touch sombre with its predominantly grey trim. Thereís plenty of oddments space, and, as with the other cars here, it comes equipped with central locking, electric windows and mirrors, and power steering. The Astra is set apart from the others, however, by its trip computer, which shares an LCD display with the radio. Along with security-etched glass, itís another useful anti-theft measure from Vauxhall.

Thereís nothing much wrong with the RS2000ís cabin, yet somehow it doesnít square with the price tag. The plastic wheel, the drab velour for the Recaro seats, the cheap-looking plastic components for the centre console; all spell low rent rather than hot hatch. But thereís nothing wrong with the basic positioning of controls, and the range of adjustment for the seat and telescopic wheel adjustment is excellent.

Dashboard
Tipo's facia is unusually high.
Fiat has tried harder with the Tipoís light and airy cabin, finished in attractive light-coloured checked cloth. A full complement of gauges and nicely finished leather Momo wheel provide a distinctly sporting flavour, but the driving position remains slightly Italianate, the stalk control switches are fiddly and illogical, and the nasty rubber-covered gearknob feels clammy to the touch. But it does get an electric sunroof (manual on the Ford or Vauxhall) and remote central locking.

The Civic VTi appears lower and leaner than the others, but it also feels cheaper. The doors close with a tinny clang, the trim material looks like nylon and feels generally nasty, the rear seats donít appear to fit properly, and the designers have left nowhere for oddments other than a slim door pocket, barely wide enough to take a map. But the view from the sculpted driverís seat looks good with the contoured facia and businesslike instruments, and the leather three-spoke wheel feels just right.

Visibility isnít a problem with any of these, but the Tipoís facia is fairly high for shorter drivers, and its rear window gets obscured with spray at the first hint of a shower. Its ventilation system canít match that of the others either, with a heater thatís sluggish to throw out any warmth.

COMFORT AND SPACE

Seats 5
Tipo's a full five-seater with bench seat.
Only the Fiat Tipo can boast five-door practicality for the driving enthusiast with a family. Itís a full five-seater too, thanks to the wide bench rear seat. Both the Astra and the RS2000 can accommodate four adult passengers without a crush, but the Civicís restricted rear knee-room means it loses out to the others in the space race. The Escort and Astra each have driver seat height adjustment, so headroom is generous, but the Astra has a little more driver legroom than the RS2000.

All have split/folding rear seats, but although the Civic has a luggage cabinet below the boot floor thereís no cover for the main luggage area. It also has a split rear tailgate, though weíre not quite sure where the advantage, if any, lies. For luggage capacity, thereís little to choose between the Astra, the RS2000 and the Tipo. All have good sized boots, much larger than the Civicís.

Boot
Five-doors make the Tipo practical.
Both the Astra and the RS2000 would benefit from improvements to noise refinement. In each case itís the vocal engine that dominates, resulting in an unpleasant drone at cruising speeds. The Tipo and Civic are more restrained and sound encouraging rather than annoying. Tyre noise can be intrusive on all of these when driving on coarse surfaces, but itís less noticeable on the Tipo than the others.

FINISH AND EQUIPMENT

Vauxhall has acquired a fair reputation for build quality, but although our test car appeared to be solidly built and well finished it suffered from too many interior shakes, the central locking sometimes worked of its own volition, the gear lever gaiter came loose, and the battery went flat.

There were no such troubles for the RS2000. It didnít look quite as well finished as the Astra, but nothing broke or fell apart, which makes the dreary styling and even duller interior even more of a shame. The Hondaís shiny paint and accurate panel fit impressed, as did the engine, almost a work of art in itself, but this is only met with a disappointingly cheap interior. Fiat has improved its build quality hugely recently, and the Tipo 16v seems almost up to Ford standards other than in the generous gaps between panels.

VERDICT

There is no clear-cut victor here, at least none fully deserving of the title. Each of these cars is good, often very good in specific areas but flawed in others.

The most significantly flawed is the Vauxhall Astra GSi. Even that wonderfully responsive and gutsy engine and the well-designed interior canít mask shortcomings in the ride refinement, the overall noise level or, most serious of all, the wayward steering. A shame, because itís a car that has the look of a real winner about it, and if only some of Lotusís chassis technology were applied in the right places it could be the best of the bunch.

For sheer fun and zest, the Civic VTi, with its inspirational engine, is hard to beat, and its handling isnít far short of brilliant on smooth roads. But the shabby interior, the too-lively suspension and the need for constant gearchanges lessens its appeal when the fun has to stop, and its wet-road grip doesnít match that of its rivals. Priced less than the others, itís a tempting buy nonetheless, and falls short of the overall talent of the Ford RS2000 and the Fiat Tipo 16v by only a tiny margin. Third overall.

Side View
Tipo Wins: punch, poise and fluency combined with practicality and keen pricing.
Tinier still is the difference in ability between the remaining two contenders. Suffice it to say that Ďwinnerí is a denuded accolade in a category still waiting for a real star to emerge -- even so, we didnít award it lightly. Far from it. In the end, it took the Tipoís five-door practicality and its keener pricing to tip the balance in its favour. But we were still left in awe as to how the RS2000 could be so good when the building blocks of the base Escort seemed such an unpromising start. Itís a good all-round achiever, even talented in some areas, notably the engine and handling, but why does it look so dull inside and out?

Not that the winner here, Fiatís Tipo 16v, is likely to set any pulses racing on looks alone. But its strengths run deep. The engine is punchy and refined, the chassis possesses poise and fluency; itís a car with pace and space. But if likely depreciation costs were flung into the equation too, then the Tipo might not look quite so attractive. In the final analysis, we can only conclude that this is a class still awaiting a winner fully deserving of the title.


HOW THEY COMPARE

       

MAKE AND MODEL

Ford Escort RS2000 16v

Vauxhall Astra GSi

Fiat Tipo 2.0 16v

Honda Civic 1.6 VTi

ENGINE

       

Location

Front, front-wheel drive

Front, front-wheel drive

Front, front-wheel drive

Front, front-wheel drive

Configuration

4 cyls in line

4 cyls in line

4 cyls in line

4 cyls in line

Capacity (cc)

1998cc

1998cc

1995cc

1595cc

Bore/Stroke, mm

86/86

86/86

84/90

81/77

Compression ratio

10.3:1

10.5:1

10.5:1

10.2:1

Head/block

al. alloy/cast iron

al. alloy/cast iron

al. alloy/cast Iron

al. alloy/cast iron

Valve gear

dohc, 4 valves per cylinder

dohc, 4 valves per cylinder

dohc, 4 valves per cylinder

dohc, 4 valves per cylinder

Ignition and fuelling

Electronic ignition
Ford EEC IV fuel injection

Electronic ignition
Bosch M2.5 fuel injection

Electronic ignition
Magneti Marelli fuel injection

Electronic ignition
Honda PGM-Fi fuel injection

Max power

150bhp at 6000rpm

150bhp at 6000rpm

148bhp at 6250rpm

158bhp at 7500rpm

Max torque

1401b ft at 4500rpm

145lb ft at 4800rpm

131lb ft at 5000rpm

111lb ft at 7000rpm

TRANSMISSION

 

5-speed manual

5-speed manual

5-speed manual

5-speed manual

Gear ratio/mph per 1000rpm

Top

0.85/20.2

0.89/21.9

0.94/19.8

0.875/18.0

4th

1.11/15.5

1.13/17.3

1.16/16.1

1.107/14.2

3rd

1.48/11.6

1.48/13.2

1.54/12.1

1.458/10.8

2nd

2.13/8.1

2.16/9.0

2.27/8.2

2.105/7.5

1st

3.23/5.3

3.55/5.5

3.55/5.3

3.230/4.9

Final drive

3.82:1

3.42:1

3.56:1

4.266:1

SUSPENSION

Front

MacPherson struts,
lower arms,
anti-roll bar

MacPherson struts,
coil springs,
anti-roll bar

MacPherson struts,
coil springs,
anti-roll bar

Double unequal length wishbones,
anti-roll bar

Rear

Torsion beam axle,
trailing arms,
anti-roll bar

Torsion beam axle,
trailing arms,
anti-roll bar

MacPherson struts,
trailing arms,
anti-roll bar

Double unequal length wishbones
anti-roll bar

STEERING

Power assisted rack and pinion

Power assisted rack and pinion

Power assisted rack and pinion

Power assisted rack and pinion

Turns lock to lock

2.9

3.4

3.1

3.0

BRAKES

Front

Ventilated discs

Ventilated discs

Ventilated discs

Ventilated discs

Rear

plain discs

plain discs

plain discs

plain discs

Anti-lock

Standard

Standard

£948 option

Standard

WHEELS AND TYRES

Rim type, width

Cast alloy, 6ins

Cast alloy, 6ins

Cast alloy, 6ins

Cast alloy, 6ins

Tyres

195/50 VR 15 Michelin MXV

205/50 Pirelli P700-Z

185/55 VR 15 Pirelli P600

195/55 VR 15 Dunlop D87

COSTS

Total (in UK)

£15,995

£15,600

£13,949

approx £14,495

PERFORMANCE

Maximum speeds (mph/rpm)

Top (Mean)

131/6485

130/5936

128/6465

132/7330

4th

101/6500

117/6800

106/6600

114/8000

3rd

75/6500

90/6800

80/6600

86/8000

2nd

53/6500

61/6800

54/6600

60/8000

1st

34/6500

37/6800

35/6600

39/8000

ACCELERATION FROM REST

(Time, secs/speedo mph)

True mph

0-30

2.8/32

2.9/30

2.9/3 1

2.8/3 1

0-40

4.4/43

4.2/41

4.3/41

4.0/41

0-50

6.0/54

5.5/52

5.9/50

5.4/52

0-60

8.3/65

7.2/62

8.2/60

7.3/63

0-70

10.7/75

10.1/73

10.7/70

9.8/74

0-80

13.7/85

12.6/84

13.6/80

12.3/85

0-90

17.4/95

16.5/95

17.6/91

16.2/95

0-100

22.2/106

20.6/105

22.6/101

20.8/105

0-110

29.7/117

26.3/114

30.2/111

26.2/116

Standing qtr mile (secs mph)

16.4/87

15.9/89

16.3/87

15.8/89

Standing km (secs mph)

29.7/110

29.0/112

29.7/110

28.8/113

30-70 thro gears (secs)

7.8

7.2

7.8

7.0

ACCELERATION IN TOP

mph

2040

10.1

10.8

10.6

10.3

30-50

9.5

10.6

9.9

9.9

40-60

9.3

9.9

9.7

9.7

50-70

9.3

9.9

10.4

9.8

60-80

10.2

10.1

11.0

11.6

70-90

11.0

10.6

11.1

13.7

80-100

11.9

11.4

12.2

15.5

90-110

13.7

12.6

13.4

20.2

100-120

19.0

18.2

-

-

ACCELERATION IN 4th/3rd

mph

2040

6.9/4.8

7.4/5.3

7.9/5.3

7.2/5.0

30-50

6.4/4.5

7.1/4.8

7.3/5.0

6.7/4.9

40-60

6.4/4.5

6.7/4.5

7.5/4.8

6.9/5.2

50-70

6.5/4.6

6.5/4.4

7.4/4.8

7.6/5.1

60-80

6.7/-

6.5/4.9

7.2/5.4

8.0/5.0

70-90

7.2/-

6.9/-

7.8/-

8.4/-

80-100

8.4/-

7.9/-

9.1/-

8.9/-

90-110

-/-

10.1/-

-/-

9.8/-

FUEL CONSUMPTION

Overall mpg

25.9

26.4

25.0

26.9

Touring mpg

30.8

34.1

28.3

35.8

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